Unravelling the extinction risk of poorly-known groupers

Mar. 30, 2016 by

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List classifies species into categories of risk of extinction. Assessments are mostly based on quantitative data and evaluate if the population of a given species is either declining or stable. Species

‘Twilight zone’ fish swim silently with forked tails

Jan. 20, 2016 by

An international team of researchers has identified a way to predict which reef fish can live across a greater range of depths, increasing their chances of surviving natural disasters such as cyclones and coral bleaching. Study lead author, Dr Tom

Large orb-webs adapted to maximise total biomass not rare, large prey

Nov. 6, 2015 by

Spider orb-webs are the ultimate anti-ballistic devices, capable of dissipating the relatively massive kinetic energy of flying prey. Increased web size and prey stopping capacity have co-evolved in a number orb-web taxa, but the selective forces driving web size and

How much coral reef does the world have?

Aug. 4, 2015 by

How much coral reef does the world have? [link]

The life of fishes at the world’s smallest and isolated tropical island

Mar. 18, 2015 by

Reef fish communities have been intensely studied on large reef systems in the Caribbean Sea and Western Pacific regions, whereas communities on small and remote oceanic islands are still poorly understood. Logistical constraints imposed by remoteness limit fieldwork time and increase

Food quality and reef fish diversification

Jul. 18, 2014 by

The big disparities in species richness among evolutionary lineages have been fascinating and challenging scientists since Darwin’s time. Although geographical factors have been traditionally thought to promote speciation, the importance of ecological interactions as one of the drivers of diversification

Global change pushing reef fishes towards their energetic limits

Jun. 18, 2014 by

A new study suggests that reef fish species may be hitting a ‘glass ceiling’ as water temperatures raise while reef predators receive substantial energy subsides from sources outside the reefs. An international team of researchers led by scientists at Macquarie